Random March of video game thoughts

Don’t know if it is the coming fall here in Australia, but just when I had my mind made up that there were no good-creative-inventive-odd-not-another-sequel video games coming out, the latest Game Informer has not only one but at least three interesting titles that didn’t reach my radar before.

The Talos Principle has been marketed as a first person puzzle game with philosophical underpinnings that make you really question your humanity. Sounds like a game for everyone who enjoyed Asimov’s robot books – yeah, that’s me! I even got Steam installed on my old MacBook Pro without any problems – legendary as I haven’t played anything major on a computer since the age of Morrowind, but done my gaming with consoles instead. 😀 Will just need to cross my fingers and hope it runs.

Another interesting (what an understatement) title is That Dragon, Cancer. This is a game developed by parents who in real life lost their very young son to cancer. The aim of the game is to convey the experience of being the kid and getting to know his life through exploring the game. Napkins anyone?

Life Is Strange: Episode 1 – Chrysalis seems to be more like a reality rewind kind of an adventure game where you can experiment how your actions make various ripples in the future. You are tossed into situations which you can change by going back in time and see what happens. I don’t know if this interests me because I just finished reading the magnum opus 11.22.63 by Stephen King, but it sounds something worth checking out.

It almost feels again like [a positively potential itch] video games are evolving to another more mature lineage. And I’m not saying this as some kind of a snob: I mostly play FPSs, currently the newest Borderlands.

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2 thoughts on “Random March of video game thoughts

    • You know, I really enjoyed the beginning, especially the descriptions of the tastes and sounds of the 50s. King is a master in describing things. I really want to taste that root beer! A couple of parts in the book made it a bit lazy in my regard. I don’t know, perhaps a bit shorter version could have worked. Still, I enjoyed the book. It also dealt with JFK in a nice way. In the end, it actually wasn’t the focus of the book at all. Difficult to rate the book with numbers: perhaps around 8 in the scale of 1-10? At least when comparing to his previous works. 🙂

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