Spotify; don’t know what to make of it.

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Gary Simmons (Licence)

The awful thing in this is that after just two days of using it, I just love the service.

I listen to music a lot. I think I’m one of those people you would say can’t live without music. It means to me more than just a background noise; I love the melodies, the rhythm, every different instrument separately and together [I’m one of those hearing even the good bass lines in the back], the lyrics, the gigs the album artwork: everything.

It’s not long ago, maybe a day or two, when I moaned about how I’m still just going to buy my music in CD and ignore these rather new web services around. And the came the Spotify invite.

Today I went to this music store, and somehow automatically came the thought about me having this service and there’s still lot of secrets to be found from its endless horizon of different, unexplored music. ‘Cause I’m always finding new bands and artist.

So there you have it, I’m hooked. But still, I will be buying the ‘real things’ as CD. Recently I justified this with a fact that I like the album art and printed lyrics, and also me as being a art director and a designer can give value for the good production. Like in the case was with the Mastodon album.

But in the other hand, being in love to the CD cover is like eating meat that you know is unethically produced: you may like it, but you know there’s some kind of exploitation behind it.

Think of the benefits of music being just the electric waves. No discs, no covers, no useless cellophane wrap; nothing in the physical world that someone has to manufacture, pack and transport to hundreds of different places. Nothing to left as trace when the ‘consumer’ stops to ‘consume’ and wants to throw the whole thing away. There comes a lot of pollution and waste in the before mentioned process. Well maybe I’m doing over thinking here, but can you say it’s not true?

But, what happens to artists and their pay? That troubles me the most.

People should understand, that if there’s a service where you can get almost all music in the world with only 10 $ per month, someone undoubtedly looses revenue and it won’t be the record label who gets the hardest hits. It will most surely be the artist. And if there’s someone saying “Them artists do music because they love it, they don’t need that much money”, I’ve got just one thing to say to you: Piss off with your ignorance.

One thing that Spotify can’t do [yet] is make the music come with me everywhere I go. I believe Nokia is trying this with its ‘Comes with music’, but I don’t know how that is currently going. Most likely not as good as it supposed to ’cause no ones writing about it all the time.

Well, for the final thought about this all. I watched today in a class where I went, how my teacher fought with her cassette player trying to rewind the right spot for us from the tape. After this we watched a video [yeah, a VHS]. Some rewinding took place again. Right there, all of a sudden, I felt how many things had changed and how I felt how prehistorical tools she was using. So I was thinking that is me trying to stick with the CD [and justifying it with some thin excuses] a same kind of almost embarrassing act?

Oh just one more thing: whole the time I was writing this post, I was listening The Black League‘s new album that came out this spring. From Spotify.

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5 thoughts on “Spotify; don’t know what to make of it.

  1. I like CD covers and album art too, so I’m glad Spotify has that. Ideally you would be able to zoom in to see the artwork better and see the back cover too.

    I’ve used Spotify for a while now, but I still buy CDs too. Mostly CDs from smaller bands who aren’t on Spotify (yet), but sometimes just to show my appreciation to the band directly (and of course for the nice shiny CD inserts).

    Great post btw! 😉

  2. “People should understand, that if there’s a service where you can get almost all music in the world with only 10 $ per month, someone undoubtedly looses revenue and it won’t be the record label who gets the hardest hits. It will most surely be the artist. ”

    I agree that I will use less money on music because of Spotify, but I don’t quite see how the recond labels and other middlemen would have more secure slot than the artist. Undoubtedly there will be losers among the artists too, but ultimately they are ones I want to give my money. Spotify, potentially, offers a more direct and efficient transmission media from the artist to me than the CD does. In the long-term, that should be good for both artists and me. Another winner might be All Music and the like, as they have opportunity to replaces music stores and record labels place as the gatekeepers of the market.

    (I don’t have a webhome, so I’m linking to TED.org, because if I had a webhome, I’d want it to be remarkable like TED.)

    • This sentence you quoted was maybe a bit to ‘shake the coconut tree and watch what falls from there’. So, your comment was one of them. 🙂

      But the thing I was thinking was this: if the sum of money is crucially smaller that the music lover uses to music, where comes the artist’s pay? It won’t be over one night as the record labels relinquish their era of terror, so to speak. The machine, the business model, has been there so long, so it most likely takes time for alternative models to become established and standardized.

      Or will there even be standards anymore? What could work for a big mainstream band, won’t possibly work for a smaller niche band.

      Another winner might be All Music and the like, as they have opportunity to replaces music stores and record labels place as the gatekeepers of the market.

      This is a nice sentence and these are same as my thoughts at their most positive about this all. Thanks for sharing your thoughts TED, and the invite. 😉

  3. Interesting thoughts. I also have started using Spotify only recently, so I haven’t yet made my mind about it. I use it mainly to pre-listen songs before buying them on the iTunes Store. For me it’s critical to be able to take my music-library everywhere, so Spotify-like services are not yet exactly, what I want.

    Record-labels must be having hard times fighting music-piracy and illegal downloads, cause they have gone this far by offering free music -experience. It’s easy to easy see, why Spotify is popular as a free service (and almost ad-free), but making it a good business is very difficult.

  4. Pingback: Of virtual distribution of entertainment, and its sustainability « Momentary Lapse of Reasoning

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